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See the

Vermont Nature News™

pages for more information about the birds, plants, mammals and amphibians of Northern Vermont.

Hazen's   Notch   Association
Bringing People Together to Conserve Vermont's Natural Resources
 ______  Atlas of Vermont's Breeding Birds  _____

 

   

 

Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas - 2005

   The warm and drier conditions of the Summer of 2005 were superb for the nesting of native birds. Food was abundant and the rigors of the weather were minimal.

   To the list of 32 bird species confirmed in the first two years of the atlas effort (see below), the following species were added in the Hazenís Notch Priority Block #1:

  • Hermit Thrush (nest)
  • Scarlet Tanager (adult carrying food)
  • Black-throated Blue Warbler (adults carrying food)
  • Least Flycatcher (two adults giving distraction displays)
  • Broad-winged Hawk (several sighting of recently fledged young and adult carrying food)
  • Dark-eyed Junco (adults carrying food)
  •    We were able to upgrade Blackpoll Warbler from a Possible to a Probable.

       Two summers remain to complete the atlassing project. At the beginning of the 2005 season and estimated 6000 hours of atlassing have been accomplished by more than 300 volunteers statewide. To date, 83 species of birds have been observed and of that 38 species have been confirmed in the Hazenís Notch Priority Block.

       The Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas has a very user friendly website for learning more about the project: University of Vermont: Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas

    Deborah Benjamin, Project Coordinator

    Hazen's Notch Association

    September 3, 2005




    Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas - 2004

       Volunteers from the Hazen's Notch Association and elsewhere around Vermont have completed the 2nd season of the 5-year project to document the status of Breeding Birds of Vermont and to publish the results as the 2nd Edition of the Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas (first published in 1985).

       Evidence of breeding birds on the Hazenís Notch Priority Block #1 was collected by Debbie Benjamin with helpful tips from HNA staff members. This year we were able to confirm an additional 14 species of birds to add to the 18 species confirmed in 2003.

       Below is a list in taxonomic order of the 32 species of breeding birds that have been confirmed so far.  An asterisk (*) is placed next to a species name that was confirmed in 2004.

  • Ruffed Grouse
  • Wild Turkey
  • American Woodcock
  • Rock Dove
  • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker *
  • Eastern Phoebe
  • Red-eyed Vireo
  • Blue Jay
  • American Crow
  • Tree Swallow
  • Barn Swallow
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • White-breasted Nuthatch *
  • Golden-crowned Kinglet *
  • Eastern Bluebird
  • Wood Thrush *
  • American Robin *
  • European Starling
  • Cedar Waxwing *
  • Chestnut-sided Warbler *
  • Black-throated Green Warbler *
  • Ovenbird *
  • Common Yellowthroat *
  • Chipping Sparrow
  • Song Sparrow
  • White-throated Sparrow *
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak *
  • Indigo Bunting *
  • Common Grackle
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Evening Grosbeak *
  • House Sparrow

  • Asterisk (*) denotes species confirmed in 2004.  All other species confirmed in 2003.

    Deborah Benjamin, Project Coordinator

    Hazen's Notch Association

    September 1, 2004




    Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas - 2003

       The first season of the five-year project to gather data on the breeding status of birds in Vermont has come to a close. Statewide, 300 birders have volunteered their time to monitor blocks that were established in the late 1970ís to gather information for the first edition of the Breeding Bird Atlas of Vermont which was published in 1985.

       In 2003, 219 blocks of the possible total of 368 have been assigned. A block is a five kilometer square that is approximately 1/6th of a USGS topographical map. The Hazenís Notch Association is helping to gather data. Staff Naturalist, Debbie Benjamin, has volunteered to cover the Hazenís Notch priority block # 1. The survey area is as follows: in the northwest from the junction of the north end of the Regan Road and Rt. 58; to the northeast at Rt. 58 just before the junction with the Amidon Road; to the southeast at Rt. 118 just south of the Regan Road; and to the west about 1 mile west from Rt. 118 on the Gibou Road .

       During the first survey period from 1976 to 1981, 75 species were observed in the Hazenís Notch block. Of those, 42 species were confirmed as breeding birds by observing either adults feeding their young, eggs in nests, or newly fledged birds and other signs of breeding activity. 14 species were classified as probable breeders and another 19 species were considered possible breeders.

       In the 2003 survey, 79 species were observed. Of those, 18 species were confirmed as breeding species; 41 species were classified as probable breeders and 19 species as possible breeders; 1 species was observed although it was not in habitat suitable for breeding. In the next four years, we will seek to upgrade probable breeding species to confirmed status and to look for additional species. The goal is to confirm 50% of the observed species as being confirmed breeding birds, at which time the block is considered to be completed.

       The confirmed species in the Hazenís Notch priority block in 2003 are:

  • Eastern Bluebird
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • American Crow
  • Rock Dove
  • Common Grackle
  • Ruffed Grouse
  • Blue Jay
  • Eastern Phoebe
  • Chipping Sparrow
  • House Sparrow
  • Song Sparrow
  • European Starling
  • Barn Swallow
  • Tree Swallow
  • Wild Turkey
  • Red-eyed Vireo
  • American Woodcock
  •    Two species that were confirmed as breeding birds in 2003 and that were not even observed in the first atlas endeavor are Wild Turkey and Eastern Bluebird. Populations of both species have increased in the past few decades. In the case of the Wild Turkey, limited hunting and possibly milder winters have allowed them to expand their range. Eastern Bluebirds have increased in numbers possibly due to the placement of nest boxes in suitable habitat.

       We look forward to continuing this important research that promotes the protection of breeding bird habitat in Vermont.

    Deborah Benjamin, Project Coordinator

    Hazen's Notch Association

    November 2003




    This page was last updated on January 31, 2017

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